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Man and woman hiking on trail with lake and mountains in background.

Hiking & Running

General Information About Hiking & Running in Frisco

Nothing beats the simplicity of exploring beautiful places with little more than just the shoes on your feet and a smile on your face! From the Frisco Peninsula single track to the Peaks trail, Frisco has miles of trails, whether you are looking for a lung-burning challenge or a mellow scenic stroll. Check out a full round-up of single track trails in Frisco below. And if walking or running on paved trails is more you thing, the Summit County Recreational Pathway offers over 55 miles of recreational paths that wind around and through Frisco and Summit County, connecting the neighboring communities of Breckenridge, Silverthorne, Dillon, and Keystone Resort. 

Trails in Frisco

Girl standing on rock looking out at Lake Dillon and Buffalo Mountain.

Peninsula Recreation Area

Home to the Frisco Adventure Park, the Peninsula Recreation Area trails are free to use in the Summer! Beginner-friendly with views of Lake Dillon, Buffalo Mountain, and the Tenmile Range, you can explore or find a great spot for a lunch break in between all the other fun activities you can do here. Download a map of Frisco Peninsula trails.

Directions

Directions to Frisco Adventure Park

The Frisco Adventure Park is located between Frisco and Breckenridge on Highway 9. From Main Street Frisco, follow CO-9/ Summit Boulevard southbound for 1 mile, turn left onto Recreation Way (at the traffic light). There are several different parking lots off of Recreation Way and near the Day Lodge and Nordic Center.

Rainbow Lake

  • USNFS Difficulty Rating: EASY
  • Mileage: (From Second Avenue trailhead) approximately .75 miles one-way
    • Out and back, or take Miners Creek Road to the bike path back to Town
  • Approximate elevation start: 9,097 feet
  • Approximate elevation end: 9,560 feet
  • No trash receptacles or restrooms at the trailhead

Short and sweet, this locals’ favorite trail eventually leads to the Peaks Trail, which goes all the way to Breckenridge if so motivated. There are two trailheads – one which is an easy walk from Main Street and one near County Commons and the hospital. Whenever possible walk to these trailheads, as they can get busy.

Directions

County Commons/Miner’s Creek Trailhead

From Main Street Frisco, turn right at the traffic light onto CO-9/ Summit Boulevard southbound, then turn right at the roundabout (County Road 1004) towards the Summit County Commons government complex. Follow this road for approximately 100 yards and turn right, then turn immediately left onto the paved Recreation Pathway. Be sure to yield to other users. Continue for another 0.3 miles to the parking area at a gate. This parking area will access Peaks Trail, Rainbow Lake trail, Masontown (from Rainbow Lake), and Miner’s Creek Road. Just hike up Miner’s Creek Road, following the paved path at first and crossing the Recreation Path onto the dirt Miner’s Creek Road. Eventually, you will see a right hand turn onto the Rainbow Lakes Trail. During the summer, you can continue further up the rough, 4 x 4 road in your vehicle and get very close to the Peaks Trail sign. Parking will be an issue so driving further up Miner’s Creek Road for trail access is not recommended.

Zach’s Stop

This is a very popular trailhead and often fills very early – parking is not available in the surrounding neighborhoods.  Please consider parking at the free lot at 3rd Avenue and Granite Street and walking the path to Zach’s Stop – or walking from lodging, Summit Stage stops, or Main Street. 

Head west on Main Street Frisco, turn south onto Second Avenue and follow this road about 5 blocks. Take a right on South Cabin Green. Cross over the paved recreation pathway after stopping at the stop sign (to yield to pathway users) you will see the trailhead parking area. In the parking area you will see a sign with an arrow that says Rainbow Lake. Venture through a wetland on a boardwalk, through aspen trees and lodgepole pines until you arrive at a beaver pond called Rainbow Lake. This trail also connects to Miners Creek Road, the Peaks trail to Breckenridge and the Masontown/Mount Royal trail.

Reflection of clouds on rainbow lake with mountain in background.
Rainbow Lake Trail, Frisco, Colorado
Rocky trail

Peaks Trail

  • USNFS Difficulty Rating: MODERATE to MORE DIFFICULT
  • Mileage: 7.8 miles one-way
    • Hike to our neighboring Town of Breckenridge and hop on the Summit Stage, or double back and end in Frisco.
  • Approximate elevation start: 9,110 feet (Frisco)
  • Approximate elevation end: 10,075 feet (Breckenridge)
  • No trash receptacles or restrooms at the trailhead

The Peaks Trail can take you all the way to Breckenridge if you are feeling particularly ambitious. There is not a huge elevation gain; don’t let the big hill at the beginning fool you, and you go through varied terrain from meadows to forests. Be aware that many mountain bikers use this trail. There are two trailheads – one which is an easy walk from Main Street and one near County Commons and the hospital. Whenever possible walk to these trailheads, as they can get busy.

Directions

County Commons/Miner’s Creek Trailhead

From Main Street Frisco, turn right at the traffic light onto CO-9/ Summit Boulevard southbound, then turn right at the roundabout (County Road 1004) towards the Summit County Commons government complex. Follow this road for approximately 100 yards and turn right, then turn immediately left onto the paved Recreation Pathway. Be sure to yield to other users. Continue for another 0.3 miles to the parking area at a gate. This parking area will access Peaks Trail, Rainbow Lake, Masontown (from Rainbow Lake), and Miner’s Creek Road. Just hike up Miner’s Creek Road, following the paved path at first and crossing the Recreation Path onto the dirt Miner’s Creek Road. Eventually, you will see a left hand turn onto the Peaks Trail. During the summer, you can continue further up the rough, 4 x4 road in your vehicle and get very close to the Peaks Trail sign. Parking will be an issue so driving further up Miner’s Creek Road for trail access is not recommended.

Zach’s Stop

This is a very popular trailhead and often fills very early – parking is not available in the surrounding neighborhoods.  Please consider parking at the free lot at 3rd Avenue and Granite Street and walking the path to Zach’s Stop, or walking from lodging, Summit Stage stops, or Main Street rather than driving your vehicle to the trailhead.

Head west on Main Street Frisco, turn south onto Second Avenue and follow this road about 5 blocks then take a right on South Cabin Green. Cross over the paved recreation pathway after stopping at the stop sign (use caution and yield to pathway users) to get to the trailhead parking area. In the parking area you will see a sign with an arrow that says Rainbow Lake. Venture through a wetland on a boardwalk, through aspen trees and lodgepole pines until you arrive at a beaver pond called Rainbow Lake. This trail will then connects to the Peaks Trail. This is also the trailhead for Masontown/Mount Royal trail.

Lily Pad Lake (from Meadow Creek Trailhead)

  • USNFS Difficulty Rating: MODERATE to MORE DIFFICULT
  • Mileage: From Meadow Creek trailhead to Lily Pad Lake: 1.3 miles one-way
    • Out and back trail, or hike to Wildernest neighborhood via Lily Pad Lake trail and take Summit Stage bus back!
  • Approximate elevation start: 9,157 feet
  • Approximate elevation end: 9,917 feet
  • No trash receptacles or restrooms at the trailhead

Lily Pad Lake is a great scenic jaunt with a wonderful destination.

Directions

From CO-9/Summit Boulevard, head towards I-70, exit 203. Take the roundabout, but do not enter I-70, instead, take the dirt road that parallels I-70 Westbound. You will see a sign for the Meadow Creek Trailhead. Parking is available down the dirt road near the trailhead sign. This trail switchbacks through Aspen tree stands. At .6 miles into the hike, you will see the trail split to Meadow Creek or to Lily Pad Lake. Take the path to Lily Pad Lake and go another .7 miles to the lake. For an easier way to access Lily Pad Lake, check out COTrex  for Wildernest neighborhood access in Silverthorne.

Aspen trees with Columbine in the foreground
Rocky trail and Aspen trees, late summer

North Ten Mile

  • USNFS Difficulty Rating: MODERATE to MORE DIFFICULT
  • Mileage: 2 miles one-way to Wilderness Boundary, 3.4 miles one-way to Gore Trail intersection
    • Close backcountry access at the end of Frisco’s Main Street, great hike for dogs because of ample water access.
  • Approximate elevation start: 9,160 feet
  • Approximate elevation end: 10,826 feet
  • No trash receptacles or restrooms at the trailhead

North Ten Mile can be an easy out and back or you can use it to go all the way to Copper or even Vail. The trip to Copper and Vail are big hikes so prepare well before you take those on.

Directions

The National Forest trailhead  and public parking area for North Tenmile Canyon is directly off of exit 201 (the Frisco Main Street exit off of I-70).  You could also easily walk to this trailhead down Main Street from Downtown Frisco (towards I-70, away from Lake Dillon). This trail is a locals’ favorite because of its accessibility and closeness to Ten Mile Creek. If coming off of I-70 at exit 201, the parking area is just to the right of the exit (North side of I-70).  Don’t let the initial steep grade discourage you from continuing on this trail. After the first mile, the trail levels out. At the beginning of the trail you will see Chief Mountain, elevation 11,363 feet, to the right. On the left flank is Wichita Mountain, elevation 10,855 feet. Along this trail there are multiple opportunities to view beaver ponds along the creek. After 2 miles on the trail, there will be a boundary fence with a sign saying you are entering the Eagles Nest Wilderness Area. Please keep in mind that designated Wilderness Areas of the National Forest require that pets be on leash at all times, and that all recreation in these areas is non-motorized. After hiking an additional 1.4 miles you will come to the intersection of the Gore Range Trail. Turning to the right (North) will eventually take you into the Meadow Creek drainage and turning left (South) will eventually take you up and over Uneva Pass to I-70 at exit #195 for CO-91 / Copper Mountain Resort.

Mount Royal & Masontown

  • USNFS Difficulty Rating: MOST DIFFICULT
  • Mileage: 1 mile one-way to Masontown, hike 1 additional mile to the top of Mount Royal for a total of 2 miles
    • Brag about this out-and-back trail after you’ve conquered Frisco’s most recognizable peak from Main Street.
  • Approximate elevation start: 9,097 feet
  • Approximate elevation end: 10,347 feet
  • No trash receptacles or restrooms at the trailhead

Mount Royal & Masontown are classic Frisco hikes and will give you a taste of Frisco’s mining history and a great view down to Frisco and beyond.

Masontown is an abandoned mining camp. Left in the forest in the early 1900s due to a combination of factors, the remaining structures were wiped out by an avalanche in 1926. There are still remnants of structures, mine shaft tailings and red brick foundations. Please leave historic artifacts for others to enjoy.

Directions

You can walk or drive easily from Frisco’s Main Street to the Mount Royal trailhead. Follow directions above to the trailhead for Rainbow Lake. Do not begin hiking towards Rainbow Lake, however, as you need to go in a different direction for the most direct route to the summit of Mount Royal. Walk west on the paved Recreation Pathway that you crossed over in order to park your car towards Copper Mountain/I-70. Walk to the Mount Royal interpretive sign and trailhead on the right-hand side of the pathway. Start the hike here. Parking lot too full? Try parking at the Kayak Park parking lot on the South side of West Main Street and walk the same Recreation Pathway back to the Mount Royal trailhead sign from the other direction. This hike is steep, but offers spectacular views of Lake Dillon and the Town of Frisco. This trail has no reliable access to natural water sources, and involves loose rock. Hiking poles would come in handy on this hike.

Trail sign with trail in background.
Three hikers on alpine tundra with craggy peaks in the background.

Miner’s Creek Road

  • USNFS Difficulty Rating: MODERATE to MORE DIFFICULT
  • Mileage: 2.5 miles one-way
    • This road helps people access to many other trails: Wheeler National Recreation Trail, Peaks and Gold Hill.
  • Approximate elevation start: 9,132 feet
  • Approximate elevation end: 9,965 feet
  • No trash receptacles or restrooms at the trailhead

Miner’s Creek Road can be a moderate out and back or you can use this route to eventually hike up and over the Tenmile Range to meet with the Wheeler National Recreation Trail which can take you all the way to Copper or to the base of Quandary Mountain on the south end of Summit County. Of course, these longer hikes to Copper or Quandary take some serious planning and preparation.

Directions

County Commons/Miner’s Creek Trailhead

From Main Street Frisco, turn right at the traffic light onto CO-9/ Summit Boulevard southbound, then turn right at the roundabout (County Road 1004) towards the Summit County Commons government complex. Follow this road for approximately 100 yards and turn right, then turn immediately left onto the paved Recreation Pathway. Be sure to yield to other users. Continue for another 0.3 miles to the parking area at a gate. This parking area will access Peaks Trail, Rainbow Lake trail, Masontown (from Rainbow Lake). To hike up Miner’s Creek Road, follow the paved path at first and cross the Recreation Path onto the dirt.  During the summer, you can continue further up the rough 4×4 road in your vehicle  and get very close to the Peaks Trail sign, or continue up Miner’s Creek even further. Parking will be an issue so driving up Miner’s Creek Road for trail access is not recommended.

Trail Conditions

For more about hiking in Summit County and updated trail conditions:

Dillon Ranger District
White River National Forest | US National Forest Service
680 Blue River Parkway (across from Target)
Silverthorne, CO 80498
970-468-5400

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